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20110301
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of the earthquakes themselves and the nuclear plant. talking about the first one hit. japan also is trying to get back to business and the tokyo stock exchange is set to reopen. the quake triggered a late selloff and the nikkei fell 1.7%, only getting wind of this the last 20 minutes of trading and the effects will be felt on monday, but the auto industry is still at a stand still. and honda, toyota, nissan, pretty much keeping all plants closed while they assess the damage. well, imagine living through all of this. and whether it's teaching an english class in japan when the quick hit. i think it was 2:45 or 2:46 in the afternoon when it did and tell us a little about what that was like. >> yeah, it was 2:46. and had an adult english lesson going on and it started shaking just a little. i thought it was, you know, nothing big deal. but, started to play like it was a joke and suddenly, it got really violent and started running out and started running with them. and now said, hang on, the building was shaking and i was on the fourth floor and everybody was gathering in the hall. >> neil: i've alwa
th of october in 1987. so, people had taken that step back for rationality, i think in japan, and by the way, i'm a great believer that markets should trade. that markets should not be interrupted. so, we had a different challenge, but, when markets trade themselves into tragedies, yes, there's an overracks, yes, there's probably irrational pricing, but ultimately the markets get it right, as we did in this country, as they will do in tokoyo. >> neil: still, i mean, i talk to a lot of smart folks like you, wall street legends, say you know, we could be looking at a double dip. >> well, it's hard in the middle of this chaos to assess the broader economic issues that come as a result of this. but, look, this economy has been rising since march of '09. we've had, you know, perhaps too much stimulus in terms of government intervention, that's being peeled back or will be peeled back. i think that it's, it's way too early to say that the events in tokoyo, the events in the middle east, in north africa will propel us into another down turn. >> neil: look, are you running for mayor
of money on foreign aid, sending it to europe, they used it efficiently. japan did. these third world dictators use it to make people terribly rich. but as to seizing the money that blankets to gadhafi, that's not our money. it belongs to the libyan people. if we seize it, we should give it to the libyan people. how we do that, i'm not sure. but to come to a quick end to foreign aid is a good idea. >> if you listen to senator john kerry and you hear the same thing on both sides of the aisle, it's very easy to say we need to support these people of these countries, to promote democracy and it's only a modest sum of money. but then you say it and it turns into something else and as a nation, we don't monitor where the money is going. we say one thing and do another. >> although foreign aid is sometimes a bribe, isn't it? >> that's why i said it was -- >> you want some outreach to these governments. i mean, i think, you know -- >> the outreach -- >> knowing what's going on in some of these countries, maybe is not such a bad deal if that's what it takes. >> another interesting irony about
of rationing in japan, and with a terrible drought in texas, we're only going to see food prices continue to climb. >> neil: so you see in the face, these guys are saying, no, no, no, not here. >> absolutely. >> neil: toby, what do you make of that? >> well, up 61% for the bottom of the food prices are. >> neil: the bottom of what. >> the bottom in 2008, that was the sort of the low end. if you look at it as the common man, as you go lower in the income world across the world, the higher tohose, the more impact those food and gasoline prices have. london is intriguing because that is the great experiment, the mish-mash of literally, 14, 15 different cultures in the greater london area and they're coming from their parents and from their poom outside the london, and saying, hey, guys, doint know how good you have it. we're dying here and this food price conundrum now has sort of blamed on the fed and the money and all of that stuff. man, i tell you it's more about lack of food. >> neil: you know, brenda, and now looking at it now and recently violent there, this is london. this is a rich c
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4